Slow Cooker Turkey Meatloaf with Gravy

meat loaf

slowcooker

There’s something beautiful about tossing food into a slow cooker, leaving it to cook for the (inevitably) busy day, and coming back to a hot delicious meal. This turkey meat loaf recipe is adapted from the American Heart Association Healthy Slow Cooker Cookbook: 200 Low-Fuss, Good-for-You Recipes. I like to serve this alongside Cauliflower “Mashed Potatoes” and roasted vegetables. Another plus: you can slice up leftovers to make sandwiches the following day (great topped with some homemade relish or salsa!).

Note: I have also used chicken for this recipe, also with great results.

 

Ingredients

  • cooking spray
  • 12 ounces ground skinless turkey breast
  • 1 3.5-ounce sweet Italian turkey breakfast sausage link, casing discarded
  • 1/2 medium red or orange bell pepper, chopped
  • 2 large egg whites
  • 1/3 cup uncooked quick-cooking oatmeal
  • 3/4 tsp dried sage or tarragon
  • 1/2 tsp dried thyme
  • 1/4 tsp dried fennel seeds, crushed
  • paprika to taste

For gravy:

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup skim milk
  • 1 packet (1 tsp) sodium-free chicken bouillon
  • 1/8 tsp salt

Preparation

  1. Lightly spray the slow cooker with cooking spray.
  2. In a large bowl, use a silicone spatula to combine all meat loaf ingredients. Transfer the mixture to the slow cooker and flatten into a 2-inch thick loaf, leaving a 1/2-inch border between it and the side of the stoneware (this makes it easier to remove later). Sprinkle with paprika and cook, covered, on low for 4 hours, or on high for 2 hours.
  3. Using a flat spatula, transfer the meat loaf to a cutting board and let stand for 5 minutes to finish cooking, before slicing or cutting into wedges.
  4. While the meat loaf stands, in a small sauce pan, heat the oil over medium heat and whisk in the flour. Cook for 1 minute, whisking constantly. Gradually whisk in the milk, bouillon and salt. Cook for 4 minutes, or until thickened and reduced. Serve over the meat loaf.

Image: Naotake Murayama via Flickr

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